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Love Horseback Riding, Issue #005
January 31, 2015
Dear Horsey Friends,


Hello,

Wow!

We're already a month into 2015! How are your goals with your horsemanship going? Haven't set them yet? It's not too late! Do it now. Find yourself a pen and paper and write down what you want to accomplish with your horse or your riding.

Be sure to make your goal

1)Specific - So you can track it

2)Measurable- How you track it

3) With a Completion Date - To give you a proper timeline for accomplishment. You can always adjust this date if needed, it's more important that you are moving in the right direction towards your dreams.


What's New

Do you know your horse's body parts? Check out this printable full size .pdf diagram. It's a great study aid for those colder days!


Reader Question- How Do I Turn Riding Into A Career?

Q-Lauren writes "I want to ride, combine my passion for horses and get paid. What is the best certificate to get and from what school? I am not convinced to do Parelli. I would consider Chris cox or Clinton Anderson, but what has the most credibility?"

A- This is a question that I get asked on almost a daily basis in one form or another here at Lovehorsebackriding.com. Unfortunately though, the answer is that there is no one size fits all solution of how to start horse training as a paid career.

There are so many things to look at that I have considered writing an e-book on the topic, so if this is something you are interested in, please let me know!

Here are some factors to consider when working towards making riding horses a career.

For instance, Lauren has mentioned natural horsemanship trainers Parelli, Clinton Anderson, and Chris Cox.

The certifications with these trainers are different than getting a 4 year degree at a university in Equine Training or apprenticing for years under a high level professional trainer in a certain discipline.

It's important for you as a potential trainer to figure out who you are wanting to train for and what kind of training you are wanting to provide.

Using Lauren's example;

She isn't interested in Parelli as a certification, but is possibly interested in Chris Cox or Clinton Anderson's certification programs.

As a whole, these three trainers fall under the same category of certifications. They are individual certifications as a specific brand of Natural Horsemanship.

In this case, Lauren would want to choose what trainer most aligns with her current training methods, which one resonates with her training beliefs, and what monetary and time commitments each trainer requires for certification.

With her choice of becoming certified with a natural horsemanship trainer, she also needs to understand what type of clientele she will be working with.

Becoming a natural horsemanship trainer with a specific certification tends to attract those already seeking information in that certain realm, or those that are already studying that specific trainer.

Next month, we'll look into equine degrees and apprenticeships in a bit more detail for how they relate to getting your foot in the door as a rider/trainer.


In the meanwhile, visit Lovehorsebackriding.com on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter! Until then,

Happy Trails!

Lisa

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